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How to Make Fool Proof Cake Pops

8 TIPS FOR MAKING THE PERFECT CAKE POP

As many of you know I get asked to make cake pops for various events. After having some major pop catastrophes and trying to make the best of the rolled cake pop method, I knew there just had to be a better way.

I had originally thought if hand-rolled pops were good enough for Starbucks then they must be easy enough to make. Wrong. Though I did find ways to make it slightly more successful, my cake pop grave yard was growing with sad little cake babies that had bitten the dust and slid off sticks into the candy, while drying, after being decorated… you name a point in the process and I had pops sliding off sticks. Plus, some people didn’t care for the extreme sweetness that came from the additional frosting. The rolled method really has the texture of cake batter rather than actual cake. The softness was part of the problem. I knew I needed something more firm to hold up on the stick. So when I was asked to do the cake pops for my sweet friend Kelly’s baby shower, I knew I needed to find a solution.

Enter the Cake Pop Pan… I had seen these before but I wasn’t sure about them. I kinda thought it was a gimmick. It was not a gimmick… it was a GODSEND! These cake pop pans have saved my life. Seriously. No more rolling, scooping, measuring, freezing, shaping, rolling more, and ruining cake pops! Each pop comes out perfectly round. I picked these bad boys up from Target for $16 each. You can also buy them online.

Here’s how to make fool proof cake pops!

TIP 1: GREASE AND FLOUR THE PAN.

Definitely grease and flour the cake pop pan before you pour the batter. This will help the cake balls pop out easily. You want perfect little cake balls, not ones that are all mangled from you trying to pry them out with a knife. Do not skip this step, trust me!

TIP 2: CONSIDER YOUR BATTER

Use a batter color that contrasts with your candy coating. This gives a really nice effect when your guests bite into the pops. I used red velvet batter to match the hot pink candy coating. Also, the recipe I used called for 1/3 cup oil and 2 eggs. I adjusted it by only adding 1/4 cup oil and 3 eggs. This made a more firm cake ball that held up better on the sticks. One cake mix made 60 pops exactly.

TIP 3: FULL CUPS MAKE FULL POPS

Fill the bottom cups completely full. I know with cupcakes and such you might be used to filling the pan only 2/3 of the way full but that is not the case with these pops. You want the pops to rise and fill the top half completely so you end up with a nice round ball. If you fill them too shallow you will end up with lop-sided pops. Bake the pops for about 15-18 minutes.

TIP 4: LET THEM COOL

After you have baked the pops, let the cool COMPLETELY before attempting to remove them from the pan. Don’t even take the top pan off. Just leave them as they are and let them cool in the fridge for about 20 minutes. This will save you from having them split in half when you try to open the pan.

Once the pops have cooled, gently remove them from the pan and place them all in a bowl or on a plate. You will notice that they have a slight edge to them.

TIP 5: SHAPE THE POPS

You’ll want to gently cut off the edges using a serrated knife so the balls are perfectly round. Don’t cut too deep, just slide your knife gently around the circumference of each ball, shaving off the excess cake.

Now that the cake balls are prepared, its time to decorate!

TIP 6: USE SHORTENING

Add PLENTY of shortening to your melted candy. I added about 6-7 teaspoons for one package of candy. If you add more candy, add more shortening. You want a nice thin candy coating. If the coating is too thick it will be heavy and the pops are more likely to slide off the sticks. Also ensure that your candy stays hot and melted. If it begins to thicken it will cause problems. If you are using a double boiler like I am (two pyrex measuring cups) be sure to keep freshly boiled water on hand and refresh the water about every five minutes. Another option is to invest in a candy melter available at Bed Bath & Beyond or Michael’s.

TIP 7: PREPARE THE STICKS

Poke holes in the pops using the stick, then drop a little candy into the hole. Dip the stick into the candy and then back into the hole you created. This will give you double glue. It really helps! Let the candy and sticks cool and harden before moving on. I like to use a styrofoam piece to hold them.

TIP 8: GET IN AND GET OUT

And now for the moment of truth. Dipping the pops. If you have done all the previous steps correctly you should be able to dip the pops successfully without having them slide into the candy. I was so nervous trying it this way, but it really worked! Out of 60 pops I only had 2 fall into the candy, and that was because I had allowed the candy to cool and thicken.

You can do this! Don’t swirl around. Just get in a get out. Make sure that you have enough candy to completely submerge the pops without hitting the bottom. You may need to add more candy after dipping several pops. I promise it will work if you follow these tips. Look at this picture. That is a real cake pop dipped all the way into the candy! Gently tap the pop on the edge of the bowl until no more big blops of candy come off. Spin and tap. Don’t do this for too long, or too hard. If you knock off too much candy you will have spots where the cake shows through. Just a few taps should work.

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276 thoughts on “How to Make Fool Proof Cake Pops

    1. Kelly McLamb

      I am planning on making cake pops using the pan method for teachers Christmas gifts. how far ahead can I make them? do they freeze well already decorated? thanks so much!

      Reply
        1. Lisa G.

          Would you recommend freezing them with the stick already in place? Or just pop the balls in a Ziploc and attach the stick later when defrosted and ready to decorate?

          Reply
    2. Lisa

      Hi. Great tips, thanks. I would love the actual cake pop recipe that you use please? I need to make some today (!) and need a fool proof recipe and am wondering if you can help please? Thanks.

      Reply
    3. Jennifer

      As soon as I read this blog, I rushed out to get this pan. I made the batter as the box directed and filled the cups as shown in the “do” picture. I baked for 19minutes as this is what my box suggested for cupcakes. At the buzzer, I checked my oven to find some batter had oozed out of the top. No problem there. Checked with toothpick, great! I cooled for 10 min on counter, another 10 in fridge and a few more on counter as I fumbled with other things. Excitedly, I opened the pan…..none had formed FULL balls. What happened? I thought next time I’d cook longer but looking back at what you instructed, you actually baked for less time. Mine weren’t burned; I’m at a loss. Please advise.

      Reply
      1. Homemaker Chic Post author

        Hmm. Well lets think. What sort of cake did you use? My first thought would be that the cake wasn’t one that rises much. The next question would be what temp?

        Reply
        1. Jennifer

          Reading directly from the box, Pillsbury Moist Supreme premium cake mix, Strawberry . 350degrees. I use this particular mix quite often. My 3-year-old daughter has a nut allergy, so I make her homemade pink cupcakes to bring to every birthday party, and as little treats. So, I’ve been dividing the mix up as to not have to use the whole box every time. It calls for 3 eggs, so I divide the mix, the cup of water, the 1/3cup and the number of eggs all by 3. The cupcakes turn out great. Could this be the problem?

          Reply
          1. Homemaker Chic Post author

            I would bet a dollar that’s your problem right there. They’re only about .75 each when you get them bogo. They’re bogo at my supermarket at least once a month. I’d use a whole box just to be safe and use the extra for a few cupcakes.

            Reply
            1. Jennifer

              I’ll try again in the morning, although I don’t have another of the same box, so if my 2nd attempt is successful, not sure we can be certain the partial box was the problem. By the way, I’m less concerned with the cost of the cake mix than the amount of tempting junk food in the house at one time. I mean, that’s torture for a girl on a diet! ;)

            2. Homemaker Chic Post author

              Lol I can imagine. I’ve never had issues when using the full box so that’s the only thing I can imagine it would be. As long as you are filling the cups all the way full like you said you are.

            3. Jennifer

              Thanks so much for your help. I’ll let you know how it goes tomorrow. Also, since I’m not great in the kitchen, I have to ask, would you recommend I follow the box instructions regarding baking times or should I do as you did in this blog. Thanks again.

        2. Jennifer

          Well, yesterday was exhausting trying to get those cake pops to rise. I researched to find what others had tried and finally, after adding baking powder, I had perfectly round cake pops. Of course, dipping didn’t go as smoothly as I had hoped, but this was my practice anyway. Thanks again.

          Reply
    4. sandra

      i’m so happy you did this… everything that you said went wrong, went wrong for me…. I couldn’t find anything out there until now… I never thought about adding shortening… THANKS!!! can’t wait to try this again

      Reply
  1. muddledmom

    Sheesh. I needed this yesterday. Mine looked like beasts. My son said, “They’re supposed to be round.” I said, “They’re homemade.” And that’s that. And the addition of the icing into the crumbled cake to make the formed balls is not good. I wondered if the pans would be better. You make it look easy. I could still easy ruin this method!

    Reply
    1. Homemaker Chic Post author

      Trust me, I’ve been there. I’ve had so many problems with cake pops and I’m really good at ruining them. The whole reason I came up with these tips is because I’ve done everything wrong that you can think of so through a process of trial and error I finally figured it out. I was so happy when I found the pans because they make it REALLY easy. I’m like you, I watch these videos on youtube thinking “What the heck? How are they making this look so good??” Believe you me… if I can do this YOU can do this. Hopefully you’ll try again and let me know how it goes. :)

      Reply
      1. Meredith

        Do you ever use anything other than the Wilton melts? I am interested in making some spice cakepops and am looking for a cream cheese icing recipe that might work to coat them. Any thoughts?

        Reply
        1. Homemaker Chic Post author

          Hmm I know people have used almond bark and also white and dark chocolate, but I haven’t personally tested it out. I often use cream cheese frosting in a piping bag to pipe a design over the candy. It adds a little extra flavor and it looks amazing. I’ll work on posting about it soon.

          Reply
        2. kerrie

          I’ve made red velvwt cake pops with cream cheese flavored white chocolate coating….delish!! I bought cream cheese flavired oil & you just add a few drops to the melted chocolate

          Reply
        3. Katie

          I’m not sure about cream cheese frosting, but I’ve made them before with thinned royal icing, similar to what you would use to flood sugar cookies and they turnd out great!

          Reply
        4. Shawna

          I’ve not tried it myself (yet:) but have seen the frosting warmed in the microwave to be used for dipping. The authors of Hello, Cupcake! have an app for the iPad and it gives several helpful tips like this. For the Wilton’s vs almond bark debate, I actually prefer almond bark over the Wilton’s because it is much smoother without having to add shortening. It has more of a frosting flavor also that compliments the cake nicely. But to really throw a wrench in the works, the best to use for taste, smoothness and shine is Ghirardelli’s Candy Making and Dipping Bar!

          Reply
    1. Homemaker Chic Post author

      I know how you feel, that’s how I was before. I looked for a blog like this for help and couldn’t find one. That’s why I knew I had to write this to help others. So glad I could help you! I would love to see pictures of your pops. :)

      Reply
    1. bstuart2001

      I’m going to thank you again, I just bought a pop pan and started googling the tips and tricks to the perfect cake pop. Your the first one that has come up with step by step instructions. My Grandchildren will be so happy when they come to Mimi’s house for Christmas. You need an award!

      Reply
  2. simplyeclecticlife

    Yummy and so adorable!!
    Thanks for stopping by & signing up to follow my blog. I’m signing up to follow yours as well. Look forward to your future posts!

    Hilary
    SimplyEclecticLife.wordpress.com

    Reply
  3. The Messy Baker

    I gotta tell ya, this looks way easier than the process I used to make cake pops for my best friend’s baby shower. I rolled a whole lotta pops. Thank you for enlightening me. And, these pops look amazing.

    Reply
  4. holly ann

    Can you possibly post any of you’re cake recipes or what mixes you’ve used? I recently bought the same pan and made the recipe that came with it and it turned out well, but I failed with the candy melts, so thank you for the shortening tip!!!

    Reply
    1. Homemaker Chic Post author

      For these pops I just used a Duncan Hines red velvet cake mix. I normally use box mixes for cake pops just because its easier to calculate how many it will yield.

      Reply
      1. Amy

        Thanks for this blog. I am going to attempt to make some Cake Pops for our engagement party and going to practice this weekend. My Mum bought me soem Bake pop baking trapys. Do you just use Cupcake box mixes? How does this tell you how many it will yield? I am guessing they come out a bit smaller that cupcakes so need less cooking time and make more cake pops than the number or cupcakes the box mix would make? I can’t find box mixes for Cake Pops.
        Also I can’t seem to find the melting candy. Can I just use chocoloate, and if so do I still need to add anything to it to make it smoother?

        Reply
        1. Homemaker Chic Post author

          As the blog explains, a regular box mix will yield around 60 pops. Bake time should be around 13-15 minutes. You can order the candy melts online using the links in the blog. Are you in the uk? I think tesco sells almond bark which is an alternative to the candy melts. Regular chocolate or white chocolate works too, just add a bit of oil or shortening to make it more smooth.

          Reply
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  6. carla Alvarado

    But these aren’t traditional cake pops.. Traditional cake pops have the batter and cake mixed together… :(

    Reply
    1. Homemaker Chic Post author

      Yes that’s what I was taking about in the beginning of the post, the rolled pops. Those are the ones that pose a problem with falling off the sticks. This version is much easier to work with for people who aren’t professionals. It doesn’t really matter which method you use, they’re all cake pops.

      Reply
      1. Kristi

        I’ve been making “traditional” cake pops for friends and just for fun for about a little over a year. It is extremely rare that they fall off the stick since I started making homemade buttercream, which is really easy, and homemade tastes so much better than canned frosting! I use unsalted butter, which cuts down the sweetness a bit. Also Paramount Crystals melt easier, blend smoothly and tastes better than shortening or oil.

        Reply
        1. Jackie Davis

          Kristi I’m with you about the traditional way of making cake pops. I’m not so sure about the cake pop pans being the perfect way of making cake pops. Some people get paid to advertise various products, but I say what ever works for you just enjoy being creative making cake pops.

          Reply
      1. Homemaker Chic Post author

        Lol I am SO with you. It’s all about having fun and eating good food in my opinion. Who cares how it’s made or what it’s called. People are so funny sometimes. Anyway this blog is not for professional cake pop makers, it is for regular people who just want to make something cute.

        Reply
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  8. theessentialgarden

    Very nice. They’re adorable. Takes me back to the days when I made graham crackers for my son, even chocolate ones. Have you ever made graham crackers? Take the plunge; you’ll never go back. Thanks for subscribing. Looking forward to future posts!

    Reply
  9. Karla

    How do you do it AFTER the whole process to is done to get them to cool off and stay nice and round???. Because I usually put them upside down and they loose their shape …

    Reply
  10. Helen

    They look awesome! I have also had more than one failed attempt with the “bake & roll” method. Can I use butter or something else other than crisco when melting the candy? I have a severe adverse reaction to crisco.

    Thank you!

    Reply
    1. Homemaker Chic Post author

      I’m not sure about butter but I think oil would work. Maybe try it in a smaller bowl and see how well it incorporates. I’ve never heard of a crisco allergy. How interesting. Do you know what makes you have a reaction to it?

      Reply
      1. The Happy Baker

        Butter will not work. It will cause your candy or chocolate to seize, as it has a high water content. Coconut oil works really well for thinning–t’s my favorite material for that purpose.

        Also, if you like the flavor and texture of the traditional cake pops, where the cake and the frosting is blended to create a creamy truffle texture, you can roll them into balls and chill thoroughly until firm. This makes them far easier to dip. The trick is getting your proportions right so they retain their shape and don’t turn into mush.

        Reply
    2. Kristi

      I’ve used oil then found Paramount Crystals. They incorporate wonderfully, and don’t alter the flavor of the candy.

      Reply
        1. Homemaker Chic Post author

          Tap them gently after you dip them until no more big drops of candy fall off them stick them in a styrofoam block to harden or if you want them to be upside down set them on a foil lined cookie sheet to harden. You can put them in the fridge if you have space. They harden in about 5 minutes so you don’t have to worry about them dripping after you’ve dipped them.

          Reply
  11. Brooke

    I’m so glad I found this! I was about to give up on cake pops. But I have a couple questions. Do you put batter in both sides of the pop pan? Or does the top pan just sit on top while they’re baking to get that shape? Then the top and bottom pans are sold together or not? I’m really very excited to try this again using your method! Thanks!

    Reply
    1. Homemaker Chic Post author

      The top and bottom pans are sold as a set and you only put the batter in the bottom. The top has a small hole for steam, so don’t put batter in that side or it will spill out. The cake rises into the top and creates a nice round shape. Good luck with it!

      Reply
          1. Priscilla

            I bought that exact pan at Target and mine were disastrous! (which could have to do with the fact that I lost the instruction manual… ha) but how do you know how much extra stuff to add? Is it always less oil and more eggs or is that just with the red velvet? Help me haha

            Reply
            1. Homemaker Chic Post author

              Wow good question. I just did what made sense to me. The recipe on the box called for 2 eggs and I figured 3 eggs would make a more dense cake which would result in a firmer cake pop. Reducing the oil just made sense because that would add moistness and I didn’t want the pops to be too moist or mushy or they’d fall off the sticks. Its really just trial and error. If in doubt just google it. That’s how I found a lot of my information. Hope this helps!

            2. Jan Wolfe

              I use a pound cake mix for mine and you follow the directions on the box when mixing it up. I spray my pan with baking spray that has the flour already added. I use coconut oil in my melted candy melts instead of crisco.

  12. Kaylah's Kreations

    I like to use almond milk instead of water to make it more dense and moist. Taste delish too! Thanks for the pan tip. I always wonder if it will hold up ok. Better to hear from other versus just wasting money.

    Reply
      1. LAD

        Just wondering how different they taste than the ones you mix the icing in with them and hand roll? I have toyed with the idea of getting the pans but wasn’t sure if they would taste the same. And I have always used almond bark (for the one that was allergic to the Crisco) and you don’t have to mix anything in with it. That was the main reason I have used it. I have tinted the white with food coloring as well and had great results. I just follow the directions on the package for melting and had great results. Oh, and get almond bark…not the QuickCandy stuff…definite difference when I accidentally got that once. ;)

        Reply
        1. Homemaker Chic Post author

          There’s definitely a difference in texture between the two. The rolled ones are much sweeter because of the frosting mixed in plus the candy. They are also softer, almost like cake batter on the inside. The baked ones are basically like a bite of real cake. They are firm and spongy. Some prefer one over the other. Personally I find the rolled pops much too sweet but it’s up to your personal preference.

          Reply
  13. Beverly

    Thanks so much for these tips.Just made pumpkin cakepops and they came out great!!!You’re tips definately helped especially the shortening in the chocolate.it really made it quick and easy.

    Reply
  14. debi land

    we made 50+ of the rolled balls with icing mixed in in various flavors, we did use the almond bark which melts thinner than the wafers and didn’t need to add a thinner. I used melon ballers to get the round shape, when they started to fall off, i stuck them back into the freezer for a little while, (not frozen solid as that will crack your chocolate) and they did fine standing in a stand all night.

    Reply
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  16. Kelly

    Im filling these the way you said and while in the oven the batter is seeping out the top Q-tip hole? Making it so I don’t have a full circle on the top?? Any suggestions?

    Reply
    1. Homemaker Chic Post author

      Hmm I’m not sure. Mine seep out the top a little as well but that usually ensures a nice full and round ball because it means the cake is rising all the way to the top. Is your oven perhaps a little uneven?

      Reply
  17. Rashelle

    They also make cake pop makers (like waffle makers) and are sold for only 3 dollars more than the ones you bought. I saw them at Bed Bath and Beyond just today. I don’t know if they work as well or not but It’s an option. Also, Bed Bath and Beyond always sends out coupons in the mail so it might help make it a similar price to the pans you bought at Target

    Reply
      1. Marcie

        I use this one and it works great! http://thebabycakesshop.com/products/cake-pop-makers/cp-12 It is like a waffle iron and takes about 4 minutes for dozen to cook. A cake mix makes about 6 dozen cake pops or more. As long as you fill them completely like you posted about, they’ll be nice and round!

        I also put my sticks in the cake pop and then freeze them for 10 minutes before dipping. The coating will harden in about a minute. I love the idea of dipping the stick in candy coating first!!!

        Reply
      1. Lisa

        I don’t mind rolling mine – I try not to use too much cream cheese icing when mixing to keep them firmer. When I make the coating I have used bags of white or milk chocolate chips and I prefer to thin the chocolate with vegetable oil (I prefer grape seed oil as it is tasteless canola works fine). As in I microwave the chocolate and stir in oil until I get the right consistency – it can be microwaved again. The white chocolate chips can also be coloured with colouring paste.

        Reply
  18. Jessica @ Stay at Home-ista

    I have fantasies of making these for my daughter’s 1st birthday. No idea why I think that my 3rd kid can have a time intensive treat, but your tutorial is super helpful! Following along now so I can keep up with your “undomestic goddess” adventures!

    Jessica

    Reply
    1. Homemaker Chic Post author

      As the youngest of 3 I can say that your baby of the family will LOVE the extra special treat. As the youngest I always seemed to get less cool birthdays. You can do it! I believe in you :)

      Reply
  19. Taylor

    Great tips, I use brownie mix, it is firmer that the cake mixes and super yummy!!! I prefer the DARK CHOCOLATE (Betty Crocker) ones. You need to fill them fuller, as they don’t rise as much. So I fill the bottom half, and then snap the lids on, then put the remainder brownie mix in a zip lock bag, cut the corner off, and then squeeze into the top hole, but my pans were the actually cake pop pans and my hole on top is larger, so not sure if this would work with your pans?… I only bake with coconut oil, so I use that in the chocolate as well, you can also buy flavors and colors for the chocolate… but it has to be OIL based, you can’t use food coloring or regular flavors.

    Reply
    1. Homemaker Chic Post author

      Thank you! Love your blog. I was homeschooled myself and I cannot WAIT to start homeschooling my little ones! :)

      Reply
  20. Connie

    Thanks for helping make my first attempt at cake pops a great success.

    My daughter had the idea to fill the holes with a left over medicine syringe. It worked like a charm. We just sucked up the melted candy in it and pushed it into the hole we made with the stick.

    Reply
  21. kathybunn

    love this, how do you package these? Would they stick to cellophane? I would love to make these and individually package them with cellophane and a ribbon.

    Reply
    1. Homemaker Chic Post author

      You can buy small cello bags at any craft store and tie them with ribbon. Once the candy coating has hardened they will not stick to the plastic. Just make sure they stay relatively cool, as they will begin to melt just like chocolate would. They don’t necessarily have to be stored in the fridge, Just make sure they stay in air conditioning.

      Reply
  22. Nicki

    I made some with my cakepop pans and they turned out pretty good, but someone suggested that if I used donut holes from the store I could do it quicker and skip the baking process…never thought about it but I may try that next time!

    Reply
  23. Kim

    I too have the cake pop pan an Love it. This is how I make my pops an they are wonderful.. I use a box cake an if it says 3 eggs I add 4 , I do the oil,water as directed BUT… If I make Chocolate cake I add a box of Chocolate Pudding an if I use white cake I use vanilla pudding. It makes for very think batter but the pops are so moist an stick together with no falling apart. I put the spray with flour in the pan both top an bottom an spray the very top as sometimes batter comes out the top hole. you just have to try the first batch an go from there as to how full you fill your pans. I have made these several times an I get around 55 pops for 1 box of mix. An you don’t have to let them cool in the pan just pop right out..

    Reply
      1. Kat Embree

        When I use the pan, I also increase by one the number of eggs, use a “goes-with” instant pudding mix, and substitute milk for the water required. It makes them hold together better. Using butterscotch pudding with spice cake mix, white chocolate with red velvet, lemon/lemon, strawberry/strawberry, etc, really makes the flavor of the cake “pop,” I have also used brownie mix, these are really good, too!

        Reply
  24. Brenda J. Thacker

    I use my small crock pot to melt my chocolate/ candy coating. I put boiling water into it, turn it on high, place a steamer basket upside down into the crock pot and place a plastic bowl with my chocolate on the basket. Make sure the water level is below the top of the steamer basket and your chocolate will stay ready to use at the ideal temp with no worries of water getting into your chocolate and ruining it No need to buy an expensive chocolate melter or risk burns standing over the stove with a double boiler. Relax at the kitchen table and take your time dipping.

    Reply
  25. Denise

    I wish I saw these before I attempted to make cake pops for a wedding lol. Dear Lord was that a mess. I would have saved myself so much time especially the shortening trick. I just couldnt understand why my pops werent as pretty. I dont know about ya’ll but id way rather use a pan then mix my hands in a gloopy mess whether its the OG way or not. Any short cuts for us busy ladies helps a lot

    Reply
  26. Betsy

    Great post! I haven’t tried those pans (I’d like to now!), but one tip I can offer is to use an empty egg carton to hold the pops while the candy hardens. I flip them over, poke a small hole in each and the the sticks stay put while they dry. Saves on styrofoam!

    Reply
  27. Anne

    I’ve made cake pops a few times now (the hand rolled ones with the frosting) and haven’t had any trouble. I even shaped some of them into rectangles for Frankenstein head pops. I think the trick is to not use too much frosting. They get too mushy and soft if you use too much frosting. Use just over a half of can. I also freeze mine overnight after inserting the lollipop stick to really firm them up. Just have to make sure they aren’t still really cold/frozen when you dip them or the chocolate will crack when it dries. I would think that just regular cake covered in chocolate would be really dry. No?

    Reply
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  29. thevelvetdoe

    Hey,

    I’m doing a white candy coating and thought I might need to double dip the candy, do you have any thoughts on this? Thanks!! Laura

    Reply
  30. Ally

    I have tried both ways. Although this is an easier way I have found that I like putting the time into hand rolling. They are moist and have more flavor where as the pan ones turn out dry and not as great. Just my personal opinion. Great blog though.

    Reply
  31. Jean Nelson

    Thank you for posting this. I am looking forward to a re do of the icing. I bought the Bakerella book and was not happy with my results.

    Reply
  32. Elena Hughes

    Just an FYI, since I make LOTS of cake pops throughout the year. For those asking for another option to the Wilton candy melts, your local baking supply store should carry Merckens candy melts. They are higher quality and taste MUCH better than Wilton, and I have found that 1 bag of Merckens goes much farther than a bag of Wilton. I just made a batch over the weekend and I didn’t use any type of shortening to thin it out. If you want a specific flavor to your melts, some come flavored (butterscotch, dark choc, etc) or you can add some LorAnn oil in the flavor of your choice to it.

    Reply
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  34. Teresa

    I have tried both ways, and am a bigger advocate of the hand-rolled cake pops. Most of the orders I get for cake pops (www.whimsyconfections.com) are for characters and shaped pops. I find it easier to get the sculpted cake I need from the rolled pops.

    Reply
  35. Lisa Robinson

    I hope you can help. i made cake pops tonight and the cake came out the top of the pan. How can i stop this from happening.

    Reply
    1. Homemaker Chic Post author

      It’s okay if a little comes out. Just let them cool and pop the little cake cap off the top of the pan. They will be fine. That just means the ball got nice and full and round.

      Reply
  36. Deb

    I’ve tried both hand rolled and the pan – with cake mix and with brownie mix. I prefer the pan, the cake pops aren’t as sweet (the frosting in them makes them too sweet for me). Brownies are interesting in the pan, the outside is like the edges of the brownies baked normally, the insides are moist. I used a microfile to clean the rim off from around the center.

    Reply
  37. Lora Timberlake Schalow

    I’m going to use the pan i got for Christmas which is the same as yours. I have made the rolled dough before since i needed horse heads, super cute but they did crack which left me apologizing at the party. I thought that adding all the shortening would make the chocolate taste funny. Can’t wait to try this out

    Reply
  38. Mary

    While I understand that some people may prefer the less-sweet taste of pan-baked cake pops, as for myself, I would be very disappointed if I bit into a cake pop and found it to be nothing more than a regular piece of cake on a stick! Making the rolled pops is MUCH more time consuming, but all it takes is practice to get it right. If your rolled cake pops are falling off the stick, chances are you’re using too much frosting or your cake balls are not adequately chilled (or both). I’m not a professional–just a regular person who put in the time and effort to get the level of results I wanted. I’m not going to lie…I still have problems with cracking, but again, there’s a learning curve to most things, and my technique continues to improve.

    More than anything, I found it really surprisingdisappointing to read that you delete comments by your visitors, just because they don’t agree with your technique. But, it’s your blog…I guess you’re free to spin/edit it however you want.

    Reply
    1. Homemaker Chic Post author

      Thanks so much for your input and thank you for being reasonable and kind in your comments. I understand where you’re coming from. This post was for people who maybe aren’t as good at this sort of thing as you and me. I have mastered the rolled method and often use that method. But i wanted to address people who had given up on it. I just know that I have talked with many people who have given up because they couldn’t get it right with the rolled method. I’ve also spoken with many people who don’t like the texture and sweetness of rolled pops. Re: deleted comments. If you’d read the incredibly rude and critical comments I’ve gotten you’d probably not want to see them. The last thing I want is for my sweet little blog to become a place of negativity and nastiness. People forget that there are real people behind this computer and say very mean and ugly things. I feel like i owe it to my readers to keep Homemaker Chic as sweet and positive as possible. Ultimately, it’s just cake.

      Reply
      1. CynthiaTobin

        I agree and totally understand. Thank you for keeping the rude comments off of your page. Keep up the good work. Very informing.

        Reply
        1. Lisee

          AMEN to taking off the RUDENESS of some people. There’s enough sadness/madness/rudeness in this ol’ World! I say “SMILE MORE & Let them EAT CAKE!”

          Reply
  39. Emeila

    I love the trick you use about cutting off the saturn ring. I have had the same experience before. I started using the Babycakes cake pop maker. Thanks for the tips and ideas.
    Emeila
    Everythingunique.co

    Reply
  40. Nicole

    I love your step by step directions, but I wish you would have added baking times. Also, I filled my cake pop pan up as you suggested and they overflowed from the top hole.

    Reply
    1. Homemaker Chic Post author

      Mine overflowed just a bit too but if you just let the pans cool and then pop that little cake cap off the top it will be fine. That just ensures that you get nice full and round pops. I’ll edit the post with baking time.

      Reply
  41. Natalie

    Ok I used these pans, and my first batch came out great, now sure what happened to my 2nd and 3rd batch, the tops fell and shriveled? I added food coloring to my second and third batch is that why?

    Reply
  42. Mary Chris Hull

    I too am not overly fond of the traditional cake pops (crumble cake mixed with frosting). I have attempted your version of cake pops with marginal success but have not tried the specific pans you mention. I may have to give them a try :) As to melts; I have tried Wilton, Make & Mold as well as Candy Quik. My least favorite is Wilton; it is the least tasty of any other brand and is much thicker thereby requiring more Crisco on average. Thank you for sharing your experience and advice!

    Reply
  43. Nina

    if i make the pops put them on a stick and freeze them without the decorations on them. How many days in advance can i make them? please answer i need to know so i can start making for valentine day. I have 3 orders of 24 to make.

    Reply
  44. jenny eales

    I too have a huge cake pop graveyard :( I have used the trays just like your but still cant get them to stay on whilst dipping. Is shortening an American term? Havent heard of Crisco either what is it please? Is it like a lard or veggie fat? I just don’t seem to be able to get this type of stuff where I am not even multi coloured candy.

    Reply
    1. Heather

      You can also use paramount crystals that you buy at cake supply stores to thin the chocolate.

      I’ve done bothe rolled and the Pam but actually had a much harder time keeping the cake pop on the stick with the pan. Not sure why so I have just stuck with the hand rolled. I have found that if you use a moist cake box mix you don’t have to use much frosting and it isn’t nearly as sweet. Thanks for the info!

      Reply
  45. Amanda

    Thx for the tips! I’m planning to make these for my daughter’s birthday. She’s a valentine baby and these will fit perfect for the occasion ;)

    Reply
  46. Tammy

    I never tried making the rolled cake pops, all that icing seemed like they would be way too sweet. Also, never that thrilled with the idea of the grandchildren having that much sugar. I’ve had great success with the pan pops, I ordered the ones from the tv commercial, and used the pudding +1 extra egg as per their directions, with excellent results. My only problem was the over flow from the top hole, I always wondered if it was because I over filled the bottom, but you say that they need to be filled completely, so maybe it’s my mixing? Do you use a electric mixer or do you mix by hand?

    Also thank you for the tip on the shortening, The directions with my pop pans said about 1 tablespoon, and it was never enough, I worried about adding two or three, but I think adding six or seven would definitely make things easier while dipping..

    FYI un-frosted pan pops freeze beautifully, when I first got my pans I made several batches in different flavors so I would be ready for the holidays, I simply put each flavor into a large Ziploc freezer back (labeled) and when I was ready all I had to do was defrost for a short time on the counter and I was ready to dip! I think I had some in there for close to a month, they probably are good for several months at least.

    I’m going to be pinning this page there are just so many good ideas!

    Reply
    1. Homemaker Chic Post author

      Thanks so much for the comment! Glad this post helped you :). Re: the batter coming out the tops- I think it’s because of the pudding you’re adding. I always find that pudding makes my cakes rise much higher. I would put less batter in the cups of you’re using pudding.

      Reply
  47. Leslie

    I am not a baker by any means! My daughter’s grandmother gave us a cake pop pan for Christmas. The first run wasn’t too bad actually. But I really think your thorough instructions will really save me next time! Your helpful hints are great for a non-baker like me. Thanks a million!

    Reply
    1. Leslie

      Oh by the way my 4 year old and I decided to ice/candy coat the overflow prices from the top of the pan. We thought they looked like seashells :) Great little nibble for me and reduced the waste!

      Reply
  48. Amanda

    My first try today for my son’s Vlentine’s Day party… It was starting off a disaster until I read the tip of dippin the stick in the chocolate before and letting it set. It is going great now! Thanks! I’m pretty sure I’d have more decorated by now if my daughter and I would quit eating them!!! Ps. I used a cake pop (waffle iron type) maker. I never even thought about rolling a crumbled cake with the icing. However, that does remind me of an AMAZING recipe that would probably work great with the ‘cake pop’ idea…
    1 package oreo cookies, finely crumbled (food processor)
    1 package softened cream cheese
    Mix ‘em together
    Roll them into balls
    Freeze
    Stick
    Dip
    Voila!
    Trust me, they are DELICIOUS!!!
    I’m wondering if the cake would be good with cream cheese instead of icing? Hmmmm

    Reply
  49. Pingback: Thoughts on Cake Pops! « Eat∙Grow∙Love

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  51. emeila

    Wow they looked really good after you dipped them. This is my problem. I am having trouble coloring the chocolate. Where did you find colored candy melts? I have the babycakes cake pop maker and love it. but I need tips on the chocolate coloring. Help please.
    http://www.everythingunique.co
    Emeila

    Reply
    1. Homemaker Chic Post author

      In my experience you need to use oil based candy coloring. Wilton sells their own. I’m not sure about other brands. Using a water based food coloring will cause the chocolate to seize up. You can pick up Wilton’s candy colors at Michaels or online.

      Reply
  52. sherry

    I have a cake pop maker I bought from walmart. I believe it was around $20. Best decision ever! Heats up in min. Only Takes 2-3 min to cook them, and they are always perfectly round with usually no edges to cut. I think it only makes 6 or 8 at a time but its less cooking time and no cooling time. They slide right out with a spoon.

    Reply
  53. Nathaly

    I was looking for a batter recipe that was adapted for the cake pop pan and I found your blog site. Although I really believe that your tips will be usefulI, I am disappointed because I cannot find a single batter recipe that do not use a cake mix (I do not use cake mix, neither ready-to-use frosting). I decided to modify one of mine, and I will see the results…

    Otherwise, I would like to share some useful information with anyone who may be interested to try what you called the “rolled cake pops method” (which turns out to be the original method to do cake pops, or POPs). I have to say that my first attempt to make cake pops using the latter method was a success (I did it for my farewell party when I moved from Scotland last year). After reading many comments/responses on your site, I guess that I was lucky! Two things helped me though:

    1) I used the techniques and recipes from the book “Pop Bakery”, by Clare O’Connell; ISBN 978-1-907563-22-5). The base for all pops should be a sponge cake (a simple chocolate version for a 8 inch cake tin is proposed in the book), and instead to use premade frosting, just combine 1/4 cup full-fat cream cheese with 1 cup of sifted icing sugar. By using this ratio of cake-cream cheese frosting, the mixture to form the balls or any shapes you want to make (this is what I think is the biggest advantage to work with this cake mixture) is perfect (not too moist, not too sweet).

    2) Before I get started, I watched the tutorial on Amazon from the author of the book “Cake Pops: Tips, Tricks, and Recipes for More Than 40 Irresistible Mini Treats “, by Angie Dudley and Bakerella (ISBN 978-0-8118-7637-7), as I am a visual learner. Of course, anyone should expect to get the perfect good looking pops as pictured in the book after the first trial (unless you are a professional baker), but you should at least succeed at making something decent and tasteful. Note that I used the 6 inch lollipop sticks instead of the taller ones (10 inch I think). And be creative. Good luck!

    Reply
    1. Homemaker Chic Post author

      I’m totally with you. I am working to cut cake mixes out completely. I appreciate your comment and I will take it as a challenge to work on something home made for cake pops very soon!

      Reply
  54. Caryn

    So glad to find your blog as I wanted to make cake pops wih all the children for rednose day but when I read that you had to curmble cake and mix with frosting I knew my own children wouldn’t eat them ( they don’t like very sweet things) but this method sounds much more to their taste!

    Reply
  55. shellyblake

    Just stumbled onto this and was suprised to see that no one suggested an alternative to frosting? I totally get using the pans to make it easier – but if you are wanting to do it the old fashioned way (ha!), then I recommend using mascarpone cheese. I’ve only made cake pops the one time and they were perfect (well, the cake pop was, the chocolate coating looked awful, but still tasted good!).

    The whole reason I tried making the pops is a cake I made was REALLY dry & even my kids didn’t want to eat it. So I asked a cowoker that loves baking what to do with it & she suggested the cake pops. I’m not a baker (hence the dry cake) and was a bit nervous, but went for it anyway. She said to crumble the cake into crumbs & then add mascarpone cheese until it was the consistency I wanted (pretty much like cookie batter). Freeze the balls for a bit, then add the sticks & freeze some more (be sure to put melted chocolate on the stick tip before inserting to help it stick). Then dip into melted chocolate for coating.

    My problem was getting the chocolate to not drip everywhere & I didn’t have a way to stand them up. So we laid them down to cool so they were not pretty. But as I said, they were yummy!

    So, if you don’t like frosting but still want the texture, try mascarpone cheese!

    Sorry to hijack the comments to share all this!

    Reply
  56. Shakira

    I am sooo excited to try this method! Thank you for making a very simple, step-by-step (with pictures) guide :) It was great reading everyone’s comments…some which were very enlightening. I am sooo not a baker, but my son just turned 11 yesterday and has asked for cake pops for his party. Fingers crossed!!

    Reply
  57. Liz Beth

    So if I’m using the cake pops pan and cake mix and pudding. … I should follow the box instruction plus one egg and then follow the pudding instructions and combine with the box mix? I read use less oil and more egg… Same water???

    Reply
      1. Liz Beth

        So, how much should I add and when? I just added it to the cake mix before pouring to the pan and yes, it overflowed :(

        Reply
            1. Homemaker Chic Post author

              Use the same amount of liquid as instructed on the box, I use cream instead of water. Then use a little less oil. I use butter instead of oil. Plus add one egg. The cream and butter make the mix taste more homemade. You can always just use the mix ‘as is’ if you like. I just found that a slightly more dense cake made it easier to dip.

          1. Liz Beth

            What kind of cream do you use? So, no oil at all? Just reduce the amount stated on the box but reduce it ( half?) using melted butter?

            Reply
  58. Carolynne

    I’m making these for Easter. Since I need to go to several families in one day, can I do the whole recipe the night before and refrigerate them or should I just do the cake pop part and decorate in the morning?
    Thanks.

    Reply
  59. Chanelle Vendiola

    I added the shortening to my chocolate but I found that when I dipped my cake pop into the chocolate it looked like the chocolate and the oil was separating. I’d get thick chunks of coating on the cake pop or crack lines. Some of the coating would be thinner on different parts of the cake pop as well. Have you had this kind of problem before?? I mixed the chocolate and the shortening to death to ensure it was well incorporated. Not sure what I am doing wrong. Please help! haha

    Reply
    1. Homemaker Chic Post author

      Hmm, I’ve never had that issue before. Make sure the chocolate stays thoroughly heated and melted throughout the dipping process. What kind of chocolate are you using?

      Reply
  60. Kristi

    Okay this may be a strange question, but I see that you alter the eggs and oil, but do you still add the water to the cake mix? I did, and I just don’t think they will stay on the stick after I get the candy coating on them. I’m I doing it wrong??

    Reply
  61. Ivonne

    Thank you very much for all your sugestions and tips :)
    I just got the cake ball pans and wanted to try them with the red velvet Betty Crocker cake mix… The recipe calls for 3 eggs, should I add one more? And it asks for 1/2 cup oil, how much would you suggest? I am a newbie… Thank you for any tip or info on this :)

    Reply
    1. Homemaker Chic Post author

      I would go with 4 eggs (or 3 extra large eggs) and 1/3 cup melted butter instead of oil. I would also use cream or milk instead of the water. It adds a richness and flavor that makes it taste less “boxy.” Hope this helps!

      Reply
  62. Ashley

    Hello! I was just in the process of reading your post via Pinterest. LOVE, LOVE, LOVE making cake pops! However, I do agree with you – the frosting/baked cake mixture is too rich & a little tricky. I actually have the Babycakes cake pop maker, which makes 12 in 5 minutes. It is WONDERFUL! It also comes with a few original recipes. Also, may I recommend the Babycakes Cake Pop recipe book — it has TONS of recipes for cake pops, treats, and MUCH, MUCH MORE! It also has tons of ideas about how to decorate them, and make them presentable, cuter-than-words gifts. Do check it out :) I am a simple kind of girl, just like you! I am also excited to start following your blog.

    Reply
  63. Genevieve Lopez

    Thanks for this post. I am going to try this for my sister’s baby shower this Sunday. My little sister bought a cake pop maker from target but i plan to buy the pans just in case. Curious about the amount of oil reduction you did with the cake mix. I saw that you added three eggs instead of two. And would it be a big deal if I just melt the icing I already have? (store bought)??? Thanks for your response :)

    Reply
    1. Homemaker Chic Post author

      I haven’t tried melting icing but I really don’t think it will work well. The candy melts harden to a smooth finish. I don’t think the frosting would have the same effect. By all means try it and let me know how it turns out.

      Reply
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    1. Tammy Miller

      I bought both the silicone pan and the regular pan. I like the regular metal pans better than the silicone.

      Reply
    2. Tammy Miller

      Last time I made cake pops, the sticks never stayed in. So I’m trying your suggestions when I make them tomorrow. :)

      Reply
  65. Emily T

    This was a total win!!! I was about to give on cake pops being too much of a process but this saved them for me. It was sooo easy to dip and I love that I did not have to add a can of frosting. Win!!!!

    Reply
  66. Michelle Roberts-Baxter

    Where can i find a receipe for Red Velvet cake mix on your site? or can you email it to me?
    many thanks

    Reply
  67. Leah McG

    Would you mind sharing the recipe you used? Home baked is so much better than mushing up store bought cakes!

    Thanks

    Reply
  68. Ramah

    Thank you for your blog, time, and effort! I finally will try to make cake pops! I’ll let you know how they turn out….

    Reply
    1. Ramah

      Yay!! sucess! I used your tips and they came out great, the looked great, and everyone loved them. I can’t believe they turned out on the first batch….Thanks to you!

      Reply
  69. Lily

    It worked really well. They stayed on the stick just fine. Only one fell off. I also was able to remove the cake pop right from the pan immediately. (Though I probably did grease it rather heavily.) It was really fun!

    Reply
  70. Pingback: 30 Blogs with the Best Cake Pop Recipes | Babysitters

      1. Emily

        I have one and I love it but NOT for cake pops. I haven’t had good success with being able to stick them on the sticks but for cake bites (or cake balls as my son calls them) it’s great and I just used mine to make garlic knots!!

        Reply
  71. Debbie Kliebert

    Having made probably more than 1,000 cake pops over the years, successfully and unsuccessfully, here is my take on it. Yes, the old-fashioned method of baking the cake, crumbling it, and then mixing in about 1/3 container of icing, hand rolling and doing it the hard way is tedious and time consuming, but if I’m going to go to the trouble of making cake pops, that’s the only way I’ll do it. I bought the cake pop pan and tried it, I used it once and it’s now collecting dust on a shelf. First of all, the solid cake method with no icing mixed in produces a very dry ball of cake with nowhere near the flavor and texture of the hand rolled variety. The cake pops from Starbucks are like that, not good. I thought the trimming of the ridge around the cake pop using the pan method was tedious too. Dipping the stick in icing and using it as glue is a must, and it’s important not to try to poke the stick more than about 1/3 way into the ball. Vegetable oil to thin the coating is good, as well as using a deep narrow cup to dip so it can be immersed with one dip, lightly tapped, and put on a Styrofoam block to let dry. As for freezing, yes, sometimes they will crack a little if frozen with the coating, but I double zipbag them, and for the most part they taste just like they did fresh. Again, lots of trouble, but for maximum taste, the only way to go!

    Reply
  72. Sandi

    How do you make your cake pops come out pink. Mine are pink on the inside but have a light brown shell. How do you get yours not to brown

    Reply
  73. Mara

    I have been hand rolling my cake pops for 2years. I make about 30 each time. so tiring! I have a cake pop pan just like that one. I have attempted to use it three times and all but once had the cake balls form in it. They bake and have a half a ball on each side of the pan, I gave up with it, Now I will be trying this week once more using the instructions listed here. I do prefer hand rolled and I don’t use frosting when I roll them. The moisture from the moist box cake is enough to hold it together for me. They produce a moist yummy ball ,the cake pan comes out a little dry around the ball and airy inside. Rolled balls come out moist and yummy all around imo. Time wise I cant or want to bake ,crumble, roll, melt and dip, freeze all of them. So I have been looking for instructions thank you! I have tried Starbucks and they are the example of the hand rolled texture. yummy as well

    Reply
  74. Gloria

    HI I HAVE TO MAKE 2OO CAKE POPS SHAPE IN BASEBALL, BASKET AND FOOTBALL SO I HAVE A LOT OF DECORATION TO MAKE, THIS IS FOR SAT AND I WAS THINKING ON STARTING TOMORROW(THRUSDAY) WILL THEY BE OK PLS REPLY ME I DONT KNOW WHAT TO DO THANKS. GLORIA

    Reply
  75. Susan

    I have 110 to make for a wedding and this was great information. Just a suggestion on the cake mix i will be doing as I only make cupcakes like this too ….is instead of milk or water only use buttermilk, the extra egg and less oil like you suggested and pudding mix. Makes the best cupcakes you’ll ever eat so i think it should work for these too!

    Reply
  76. em126

    Hey! Thank you so much for creating such a simple instruction set to follow. I’m all about the picture play by play with the how to written above it, since I’ve never made them before. I had hit and misses with them. I was wondering, even though you’re trying to create a homemade recipe from scratch to use, what cake mix brand did you use for the red velvet ones in the picture? I’m wondering if that makes a difference!

    Thanks so much! :)

    Reply
  77. Stephanie Mallett

    How do you let them set after you’ve dipped them in the melted candy? I don’t want the bottoms to be flat.

    Thank you!

    Reply
  78. Pingback: I was fired … but dusted flour off and tried again – The Sun | abejarg16

  79. Tanya

    Hi, I love that the cake pop pans work for you. That wasn’t my experience. (I’ve got a set if you want them!)
    I am still a “crumble-cake-add-frosting-hand-roll” kind of cake pop maker. My tip so the cake ball doesn’t fall off the pop is simple. Add only enough frosting so the cake feels like uncooked cookie dough and squishes like play-dough in your fingers, and once the balls are rolled, freeze them for about 2 hours before dipping them into the chocolate/candy melts. Hope this is helpful.

    Reply
  80. Debbie

    Hi there! love the blog post, but have a few concerns if i were to make them ahead of time.
    i offered to make some pops for my boyfriends sisters birthday, now i have made them before but the bake the cake and then mix it with frosting method. which completely grosses me out. anyway im just wondering. if I bake & decorate them tonight, will they still hold up on the sick 2 days from now?
    i read a previous post on a different site stating they would fall off.. so now im somewhat concerned, help!!

    Reply
    1. Homemaker Chic Post author

      I’ve had these hold up on the sticks for a couple days because I had leftovers. I’d be more concerned about keeping them fresh. I’d try to bake them at the last possible moment. Once you coat them with candy it sort of seals them for at least 24 hrs, but I’d definitely keep them in the fridge. 2 days seems a bit long. My concern is that the cake will dry out.

      Reply
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  83. Steph

    I have the exact same cake pop pans as you and I followed your steps. I left the cake pops cool completely in the pan and every time I try to take the top pan off, all the cake pops seperate. I am wondering if you have ever had this or any suggestions to correct it.

    Reply
  84. Cari

    Wilton makes a cake pop pan that is more like a strawberry shape, or cone without pointy tip. No second top pan, and they come out perfectly. They are called cavity pops pan. I use for cake pops, and for doughnut holes. My son had a tree nut/peanut allergy. We make a glaze out of powdered sugar and lemon juice. You can always just use powdered sugar, or royal icing as well for those allergy sufferers! We also use crushed pretzels over sun butter that has been warmed.

    Reply
  85. kaypeabrokebakerKay Pea

    Thank you SO much for this tutorial. I had all but sworn off cake pops because they never turned out right, but bought the cake pop pan on a whim a few days ago and was having trouble getting the dipping part to work. These were the prettiest cake pops I have made!

    Reply
  86. kaypeabrokebaker

    Thank you, thank you, thank you! I have never had much luck with cake pops, but these turned out without any headaches. Mine have never turned out this nice before! Hope you don’t mind, but I will be linking to this on my blog.

    Reply
  87. jen

    Sorry if this has already been asked but how do you make shapes if you use these pans? Do you just carve the balls into shapes? For example, I’ve made cute little hearts, stars, flowers, three “tier” wedding cake looking pops using the icing/crumbled cake method.

    I’ve got a major sweet tooth so, honestly, the icing/cake combo doesn’t bother me but I’ve had women make catty comments about how sweet they are with icing mixed in so I’d like to have an alternative.

    Reply
  88. Marcy

    My daughter is getting married this Sunday Oct. 27, 2013. Our bakery is making a 4 tiered cake pop cake and once the pops (sticks) have been stuck into the cake they are having trouble taking them out to serve without making the cake pop crack and fall off the stick. Any suggestions? Help please! Thank you.

    Reply
  89. Myra

    I have two extra tips. I typically also spray the top outer pan so if any batter comes through the top hole it will come off easily without damaging the cake. Also when it comes to the candy melts I use them full strength when attaching the lollipop sticks then I thin them out with shortening for dipping after.

    Reply
  90. Vicky

    Hi Noelle, I would like your help. I used DH classic white cake mix exactly as directed; 3 eggs 1 cup water and 1/4 veg oil. I filled cake pan to the top as you indicated. As it cooks, mix cooks out of holes but once it is cool and time to come out of pan, they are not round. They are very nice on the bottom but not full on top. Like flying saucer shaped. Please help.

    Reply
    1. Homemaker Chic Post author

      Maybe try the cake with the pudding mixed in. Some people have had better luck with that. Mine were not 100% round but were pretty close and once they were coated in the candy you could not tell. Are they badly misshapen or just a little?

      Reply
  91. The Mad Baker

    Thank you for this information. I am actually baking the balls to put inside of another cake so that when you cut into the cake, it looks like polka dots (something I some on pinterest I think). I was having issues with my bake times. I baked mine at 350 for 20 minutes (burned), 17 minutes (still burned), and 14 minutes (still burned, but not nearly as badly). I got the pan at a clearance sale at a large department store for $5. I am going to try 12 minutes tonight and see how they turn out – I should also say I am using a homemade cake recipe, not boxed, so it could be affecting the bake time. Thank you again for the great tips!!!

    Reply
  92. Melissa's Tastee Treats

    I have been making cake pops for about 5yrs now and have found that the best pop is hand rolled. I tried the pop tin but they were too dry. I make a cake and crumble it and then add the frosting. The other problem with the tin is if you want pops that are not round. I usually make animals, or stars, and other various pops that you have to manipulate the ball.
    For some above who mention the candy coating too thick, instead of shortening, I use paramount crystals that you can get at your local baking store. Also one other tip; after I dip them I stick them in floral foam so they get an even dip.

    Reply
  93. TwinkletoesTerri

    Thanks for the informative directions. I made these for Easter and they were amazing. One trick I used to “glue” the stick in place was I poked a hole with the pop stick in each ball, then I used a baby medicine dropper & dripped a little melted candy into the hole and then inserted a pop stick. I thought it was ingenious.

    Reply

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